On Good Friday, Presidential Election 2016 Commentaries are open for discussion in the USMJPARTY GROUP…

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March 24, 2016

 

The U.S. Marijuana Party has a Public Group on Facebook which will host a COMMENT SESSION concerning the 2016 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION on GOOD FRIDAY, March 25th.

 

Beginning at 8:00 AM CST tomorrow, March 25th, 2016, the FACEBOOK GROUP of the USMjParty will host a Comment Session on the upcoming Presidential Race for the Whitehouse.

It is FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC, however you must approved as a MEMBER in the GROUP in order to SUBMIT a POST or WRITE a COMMENT.

IF YOU would like to join us in this very important discussion tomorrow, you still have time to join Our 17,000+ Members at the GROUP LINK below.

We look forward to seeing all of our MEMBERS ideas and commentaries on this most very important ELECTION of the 21st Century!

HISTORY is about to be made this year in the United States!

YOU have a voice in the outcome of this ELECTION!

Above all else PLEASE make sure that you are REGISTERED TO VOTE and UTILIZE that Vote in this ELECTION!

We are looking forward to seeing you all there!

 

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There stood the real Mitt Romney naked before the Electorate!

 

 

For All To See

9/22/2012 8:51 AM EDT Tags: Romney, Republicans, 47%, politics

As the procession moved down the street, one of the children pointed and shouted, “He has no clothes on!”, and suddenly the spell was broken. There stood the real Mitt Romney naked before the Electorate!

Presidential Candidate Mitt Romney, in a glaringly honest bit of speechifying, bared his soul and revealed his true self and that of his wealthy supporters. The opinion Mr. Romney and his supporters hold of their fellow citizens is one of resentment and indignation that those on the low end of the financial spectrum should get the assistance of the Government to be successful or to just get by. That somehow wealth equals good people and poor equals bad, dependent and lazy people. Never mind the fact that almost all successful citizens have had the help of either their families or the Government in the creation of their success. There is even a video of Mr. Romney’s mother saying that Mitt’s father was grateful for the assistance he received from the Government when he first returned from Mexico.

Mr. Romney claimed that 47% of Americans pay no income tax. That these citizens are dependent on Government handouts, lazy and feel that things like food and housing are entitlements. Statistics show that of those in the 46.4% of the citizens Mr. Romney and his supporters disparage, 28.3% pay payroll taxes and of the 18.1% who pay no payroll taxes, 10.3% are elderly or Veterans and 6.9% are non elderly but make less than 20,000 dollars a year. None of these citizens make enough money to pay income taxes. They do pay plenty in State, sales and local taxes but I guess these don’t count! As bad as all this is for the Romney Campaign and for the rest of America’s opinion of the wealthy there is a greater lesson to be learned for Americans living in the lower end of the financial pyramid.

The Republican Party in it’s current form is a wholly owned subsidiary of the wealthy elite and as such , the views of the leader of the Party are the views of the Party. Americans in the despised 47% who have traditionally voted Republican need to wake up and realize that this is not the Republican Party of Ronald Reagan anymore. This Republican Party could care less about you and yours, unless of course you make enough to pay Federal income taxes. All this Party wants is your vote. They will use any social issue they can to include religion to con you out of your vote. Mr. Romney’s utterances at his $50,000 a plate fundraiser are exactly how these wealthy people feel and are the same as that of the Republican Party. As much as one might feel traditional loyalty to the Republican Party the fact that remains is this; if you make less than $200,000 a year and vote Republican you are not only voting for people who don’t like you , but are voting against your own financial interests. The Party has abandoned you and will not represent you even if you vote for them. Why would you want to vote for them anyway?

CONTINUE TO MSGT. THOMAS VANCE’S BLOG ON CINCINNATI.COM…..

Galbraith gets 5,000 signatures for governor run

Galbraith gets 5,000 signatures for governor run

By ROGER ALFORD — Associated Press

Posted: 11:03am on May 27, 2011; Modified: 1:05pm on May 27, 2011

FRANKFORT, Ky. — In a move that has helped to organize supporters, independent gubernatorial candidate Gatewood Galbraith said Friday he now has the 5,000 signatures needed to get his name put on the general election ballot in Kentucky.

Galbraith, a Lexington attorney, said he intends to collect another 5,000 signatures before turning them over to the secretary of state’s office to officially enter the race against Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear and Republican nominee David Williams, just in case the opposing campaigns challenge the eligibility of some of the people who signed.

Last December, Galbraith filed paperwork declaring his intent to enter the race for governor. Under Kentucky law, independent candidates also must collect at least 5,000 signatures from registered voters, which, Galbraith said, isn’t as easy as it may sound.

“There’s no doubt; it’s a burden,” he told The Associated Press on Friday. “But I understand there needs to be a threshold so the ballot doesn’t become overcrowded. That’s the rule in place, and we’re going to comply with it.”

Galbraith said collecting the signatures has strengthened his campaign by energizing supporters and establishing grassroots organizations in the majority of Kentucky counties.

“It’s a natural organizing tool,” he said.

Early on, Galbraith differentiated himself from the other gubernatorial candidates by taking a strong stand against mountaintop removal coal mining, charging that it has caused “unsurpassed environmental damage” in Appalachia and should not be permitted to continue.

Both Beshear and Williams have called for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to ease restrictions that have made it difficult for coal companies to get governmental permission to open new mountaintop mines or to expand existing ones.

Galbraith had received an early endorsement from the United Mine Workers of America, only to have it rescinded later. Union leaders opted to instead support Beshear, who they believed had a better chance of winning the Nov. 8 election.

Mountaintop removal has long been a heated issue in Kentucky politics. Demonstrators have been sitting outside Beshear’s office each Thursday to bring attention to the procedure, in which forests are cleared and rock is blasted apart to get to coal buried underneath. The leftover dirt, rock and rubble usually is dumped into nearby valleys. Coal operators say it is the most effective way to get to the coal, while environmentalists say it does irreversible damage.

Frankfort resident Angela Mitchell, a solitary protester who sat outside Beshear’s office for two hours on Thursday, said she’s a likely Galbraith supporter.

“I don’t’ feel like we’re getting anywhere with the other two candidates, so maybe it’s time for a change,” she said.

Galbraith also stands apart from Beshear and Williams as a proponent of legalizing hemp and medicinal marijuana, positions that have marginalized him for mainstream Kentucky voters in four previous runs for governor.

Since announcing his interest in running again, Galbraith has downplayed the marijuana issue, saying it’s only a minor part of his platform.

Galbraith said he believes he can win the general election against much better-funded candidates. Williams raised some $1.2 million for the primary election race that he won earlier this month. Beshear has raised about $5 million and is already on the air with the first television ad of the general election season.

“It doesn’t make any difference how much money Gov. Beshear spends,” Galbraith said. “If your vote’s not for sale, it doesn’t matter how much he spends.”

Read more: http://www.kentucky.com/2011/05/27/1754968/galbraith-gets-5000-signatures.html#ixzz1NaN9RC3f

In Kentucky’s Senate race, ties to Mitch McConnell could be helpful or harmful

By Amy Gardner

Washington Post Staff Writer
Thursday, May 13, 2010

 

 

MONTICELLO, KY. — When Senate candidate Rand Paul told a lunchtime crowd at Shearer’s Buffet that "we have to do things differently" in Washington and "bring ’em home and send some different Republicans," it wasn’t hard to make the jump from this rural area near the Tennessee border to the top Republican in the state, if not the country: Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Paul, a "tea party" activist and the son of Rep. Ron Paul (R-Tex.), a former presidential candidate, is not the first person this year to blame leaders in Washington for the nation’s ills. What’s remarkable about this primary campaign is that McConnell isn’t even on the ballot. Paul is running against Secretary of State Trey Grayson.

McConnell, 68, is widely credited with building the Kentucky Republican Party — the GOP headquarters in Frankfort is even named for him. Just a few months ago, it seemed inconceivable that he couldn’t push Grayson, his handpicked candidate, to victory Tuesday. Now, not only is Grayson in trouble — he trails in the polls by double digits — but his association with McConnell isn’t helping.

"They go, and they stay too long, they lose their way, and as they do they become corrupted by the system," Paul, 47, an eye surgeon making his first run for office, told a group of about 30 supporters over breakfast at Lee’s Famous Recipe Chicken in the tiny town of Albany. "The longer you’re there, the more you succumb to the power, the more you think you are somehow different or more important than the rest."

McConnell was unavailable for an interview, and his spokesman declined to comment for this article. But Grayson rejected the idea that the race has become a referendum on McConnell or Grayson’s connection to him. "He’s actually got more D.C. ties than me," Grayson said of Paul.

He’s also sure that McConnell is an asset, despite his five terms in office. They’re both so sure, in fact, that the senator, after months of behind-the-scenes support, jumped in last week with a public endorsement.

(Six Republican candidates are on the ballot, but polls show the race is between Paul and Grayson. Similarly, five Democrats are seeking their party’s nomination the same day, but surveys find that the contest is primarily between Lt. Gov. Daniel Mongiardo and Attorney General Jack Conway.)

Grayson has numerous connections to McConnell. McConnell urged the younger Republican, a lawyer from the Cincinnati suburbs, to run even before outgoing Sen. Jim Bunning (R) decided last year to retire. (Bunning is supporting Paul.) They share a pollster and a media consultant, and Grayson’s father, a bank president, is a longtime McConnell supporter. The view among some who back Paul is that Grayson would be little more than a yes man for McConnell.

"We’re sick of McConnell," said Winna Ramsey, 50, a radiology technician from Monticello who came to hear Paul speak at Shearer’s. "Rand Paul is not a career politician. He’s got the people’s interests in mind, not the special interests. He’s a breath of fresh air from what I can see."

Grayson, 38, bristles at such characterizations and is exasperated that his record of fiscal and social conservatism is going unnoticed. Grayson opposed the $700 billion Troubled Assets Relief Program legislation in 2008 that bailed out U.S. financial institutions; as secretary of state he slashed spending in his office; he served on the board of a pregnancy crisis center that counsels against abortion. He also notes that much of Paul’s momentum is the result of out-of-state donations from his father’s supporters.

Still, Grayson struggles to connect with potential backers. At the headquarters of a hardwood flooring company in London, Ky., one of the owners lamented the state of the economy, and Grayson responded: "Oh, it’s terrible." Local circuit court clerk Roger L. Schott, who was escorting Grayson, tried to prod the candidate. "What are we going to do to change that, Trey?" Afterward, the businessman, Jim Begley, said Paul seemed to have more answers.

Paul’s campaign stops are feisty affairs at which supporters hoot and cheer as he weaves his personal biography and a list of grievances with Washington into a populist call to arms. The founder of the antitax organization Kentucky Taxpayers United, Paul rails against what he describes as Washington’s unsustainable spending, crippling debt, career politicians with no term limits, a "socialist" health-care law and a failure to close the nation’s borders to illegal immigrants.

Paul has become a national hero of the tea party movement by opposing new taxes and deficit spending and supporting such ideas as the abolition of the Department of Education and amending the Constitution so that children born in the United States to illegal immigrants would no longer become citizens automatically. A victory for him on Tuesday would further energize a movement already pumped up by the defeat of Sen. Robert F. Bennett in Utah’s Republican primary last weekend.

"Greece is defaulting right now on their debt," he told the breakfast group. "One of the next things you’ll see is chaos on the streets. You’ll see violence. . . . And it can happen even in America if we’re not careful."

But Paul’s libertarian streak could lead to breaks with conservatives on some issues. He opposed the war in Iraq. He has spoken in favor of legalizing marijuana for medical purposes. A pro-Grayson advocacy group, trying to portray Paul as out of step with mainstream Republicans, is running a television ad featuring a chiming cuckoo clock.

McConnell’s advisers say the senator remains popular among Republican voters, and Paul typically doesn’t mention him by name. But his crowds are all too glad to make the connection. And the candidate got as close as ever to a direct critique of McConnell during a debate on Monday, when he and Grayson were asked whether they would vote for McConnell to keep his post as Republican leader. While Grayson answered that he would vote "proudly" for McConnell, Paul said, "I’d have to know who the opponent is and make a decision at that time."