SB 13, Kentucky Cannabis Freedom Act continues to sit in committee since January 7th

KY CANNABIS

 

sb13

There has been no activity on the “Kentucky Cannabis Freedom Act” since January 7th when it was forwarded to “Licensing, Occupations and Administrative Regulations“…

 

Whose members include:

 

Please take time to click on the links and send them a message to work on this Bill!

 

IT IS a crucial time for Kentuckians to stay in close touch with their lawmakers and offer feedback on the issues of the day. Citizens can see which bills are under consideration and keep track of their progress by visiting the Kentucky Legislature Home Page at www.lrc.ky.gov. Kentuckians can also share their thoughts with lawmakers by calling the General Assembly’s toll-free message line at

 

800-372-7181

.

 

LINK TO PDF OF SB13

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Advice from a patient!

 

 

 

Ed Bland

ALL NEED 2 KNOW THIS ! —————–>: ♥ ~My name is Ed Bland & live in Somers on Flathead lake. I use 2 have George’s marine service ( father ). I wrecked my motorcycle with no helmet on. Montana told me it was worst wreck 2 live through with no helmet on in Montana. I am not telling you this 4 sympathy, but 2 let you know the severity of it. I broke all ribs on right ( 6 in 3 places each), 7 ribs on left ( 4 in 2 places each). Split brisket, broke right caller bone, broke pelvic bone in 7 places having to be taken to Idaho specialist 2 bolt a brace on pelvic bone. Missoula life flight picked me up at wreck site at Sealy Lake. I died 3 times in that flight, was in a coma for 87 days & if memory serves me right was diagnosed as a 5.5 brain injury. When I woke I had 2 relearn everything. I could not speak but they told me 2 blind 2 for yes & 3 for no. I had 2 go through all 3 rehabs, then got 2 return home. I had next 2 no memory. I didn’t even know what house looked like, or what I had done 4 a living but could tell you how 2 use all tools & equipment in shop. I had a friend come visit me & asked me 2 get a medical card & try cannabis & did. I WAS AMAZED ! My memory not only started returning but stayed ! I have muscle paralisis on right of my body & it is so obvious of my muscles relaxing that all can see it in my walking & hear in my speech. Is hard 2 move tongue 2 speak. But 4 me the big part is how it slows my thought process down enough so can communicate !
I have been doing much research as 2 why it is helping me. I learned early in life that if you want 2 fix something then first you must understand the working of it. I only graduated high school & no more but did best could. The brain has a connection that converts info & passes it on. There lets say is like taking morris code & converting it into words. At that connection there is a goo that covers it. That is what I believe the THC helps make this in the brain. ~ ♥

LSD as treatment for alcoholism? Norway scientists looking at hallucinogen therapy

Writing in Journal of Psychopharmacology, researchers note drug gives insight into problems

By Lindsay Goldwert / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

Friday, March 9, 2012, 11:56 AM
LSD (which sometimes comes in the form of sheets of stamps, l.) is being looked at as an aid in combating alcoholism.

Turn on, tune in… stop drinking?

A group of Norwegian scientists believe that there could be a benefit to treating alcoholism with lysergic acid diethylamide, better known as LSD.

In the 1960s and 1970s, reseachers experimented with treating mostly male patients with low doses of the hallucinogen and recorded the results. The trials revealed positive outcomes but the treatment never caught on.

Decades later, the neuroscientists from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology decided to take a second look at the data.

The results were surprisingly encouraging.

On average, 59% of LSD patients and 38% of control patients who were confirmed to suffer from alcoholism showed improvement.

“It was rather common for patients to claim significant insights into their problems, to feel that they had been given a new lease on life, and to make a strong resolution to discontinue their drinking,” the researchers noted in the Journal of Psychopharmacology.

There was also a similar beneficial effect on maintained abstinence from alcohol.

LSD interacts with a specific type of serotonin receptors in the brain, which may stimulate new connections and open the mind for new perspectives and possibilities.

“Given the evidence for a beneficial effect of LSD on alcoholism, it is puzzling why this treatment approach has been largely overlooked,” says researcher Pal-Orjan Johansen.

The study authors concluded that one of the problems with the original studies is lack of patients to definitely prove that there was a positive outcome.

It was also tough for scientists to gain approval for LSD drug trials since the drug was declared a controlled substance with Schedule I status in 1970.

Scientists have also been analyzing the benefits of psilocybin or “magic mushrooms” on patients with depression.

Psilocybin seems to affect the medial prefrontal cortex, the part of the brain that is hyperactive in people who suffer from depression, reports Reuters.

Ketamine, a drug which gained popularity during the rave scene of the 1990s, has also been touted for helping patients suffering from extreme forms of depression.

Read more:

The Words of the Founding Fathers

Jurors should acquit, even against the judge’s instruction…
if exercising their judgement with discretion and honesty
they have a clear conviction the charge of the court is wrong.
— Alexander Hamilton, 1804

It is not only the juror’s right, but his duty to find the verdict according to his own best
understanding, judgement and conscience, though in direct opposition to the
instruction of the court.
–John Adams, 1771

I consider trial by jury as the only anchor yet imagined by man
by which a government can be held to the principles of its constitution.
— Thomas Jefferson,
1789

It will be of little avail to the people that the laws are made
by men of their choice, if the laws are so voluminous that
they cannot be read, or so incoherent that they cannot be understood;
if  they… undergo such incessant changes that no man who knows
what the law is today can guess what it will be tomorrow
— James Madison

Why Won’t the Government Let James Stacy Tell the Truth?

James Dean Stacy wants to tell the truth during his upcoming federal trial. Too bad the government won’t let him.

 

medical-marijuana[1]

Last September, Stacy, founder of the “Movement in Action” medical marijuana collective in San Diego county, had his shop raided just weeks after opening by agents with the DEA, who discovered dozens of cannabis plants. He’s facing federal drug charges as a result.

The arrest and prosecution have come despite pledges from President Obama, echoed by Attorney General Eric Holder, to respect state rules on medical marijuana — a fact Stacy took to mean he was safe operating his collective so long as he was complying with California law. Fourteen states and the District of Columbia have legalized marijuana for medical purposes.

But marijuana is still classified as a Schedule I drug by the federal government — alongside heroin and cocaine — meaning it is officially considered to have no medicinal value (the government’s own studies aside) possession is held to be illegal in all cases.

Over the summer federal District Court Judge Barry Moskowitz ruled that Stacy’s assumption Obama would put a stop to the controversial federal raids on pot dispensaries was “unreasonable” — and inadmissible as evidence in his defense; an admission, perhaps, that one should never take a politician’s words at face value. As for that law overwhelmingly passed by California voters in 1996 legalizing the use of marijuana for medicinal use? Stacy can’t mention that either. But he doesn’t hold it against Moskowitz.

“I kinda think the judge is pretty fair,” Stacy says in an interview with Change.org. “He’s done what the law has allowed him to do.” Indeed, medical marijuana patients have routinely been denied the opportunity to present the truth as evidence in their federal trials: that they were complying with a state law that explicitly legalized what they were doing.

The real disappointment, Stacy says, is that “the president and the attorney general haven’t stuck up for what they said they were going to do, and that they’re continuing to allow the DEA to keep raiding people.”

While the Justice Department issued a memo last October instructing federal law enforcement agencies to not pursue “individuals whose actions are in clear and unambiguous compliance with existing state laws providing for the medical use of marijuana,” more than two dozen dispensaries and collectives have since been raided. Just this month several dispensaries in Nevada were raided by the federal government, despite a 2000 state law legalizing the use of marijuana as medicine.

And federal agents appear to be picking what they see as easy targets.

There are more than 100 dispensaries in San Diego, and hundreds more in Los Angeles — Oakland even has its own university dedicated to teaching the finer points of marijuana cultivation — so why pursue a relatively obscure dispensary that had been open for only a matter of weeks, one might ask?

"They’re going after small people who can’t afford to hire these big fancy lawyers and trying to prosecute them," says Stacy. And there’s some evidence for that: another San Diego man whose dispensary was raided by the federal government the same day as Stacy’s collective pled guilty to drug charges rather than fight a protracted legal battle that other, more well-off defendants might have considered.

“I think the best we can hope for is just to tell the truth — the part of the truth they’ll let us,” Stacy says. “Lucky for me I think I’ve got some really good lawyers in my public defenders.”

He also has advocates in Congress — liberal Democrats and conservative Republicans alike.

In a letter to House Judiciary Committee Chairman John Conyers (D-MI), Congressmen Sam Farr (D-CA) and Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA) note that Stacy is “the first individual to face federal prosecution under the Obama administration’s new policy” — much ballyhooed, but not so much implemented — on medical marijuana.

“Regardless of how scrupulous their compliance with state law and/or local ordinances, medical marijuana patients and their providers remain vulnerable to federal enforcement raids, arrest, and prosecution by U.S. Attorneys,” the congressmen write. “Worse still, these persons are barred from introducing evidence that demonstrates that he or she was acting in accordance with state law.”

The letter asks Conyers to hold a hearing on a bill that would attempt to fix the situation: the “Truth in Trials” act, or as it’s known in legislative speak, H.R. 3939. The proposal would “permit someone acting property under state medical marijuana laws to use that fact as an affirmative defense in federal court proceedings.”

Conyers is himself a cosponsor of the legislation, as are a total of 32 others, from liberal standard-bearers like Henry Waxman (D-CA) and Barney Frank (D-MA) to conservatives and libertarians such as Tom McClintock (R-CA) and Ron Paul (R-TX). However, a spokeswoman for the Judiciary Committee was unable to say whether he would ever hold a hearing on the bill. And spokesmen for Farr and Rohrabacher say the congressmen have received no response in the month since they sent their letter.

But the lawmakers are “still pushing the issue,” Tom Mentzer, press secretary for Congressman Farr, tells Change.org. “As more states legalize marijuana for medical use (and California potentially going even further), we’re only going to see more state/federal conflict and there will be an even greater need to offer a comprehensive defense during trial.”

“It remains an issue of fairness and an issue of state rights,” says Mentzer. “President Obama’s move to limit arrests for medical marijuana doesn’t change the need for a legislative fix.”

James Stacy’s trial begins November 1st. And though the odds — and federal law — are stacked against him, he remains hopeful he will ultimately win, whether he’s allowed to tell the complete truth or not. In the meantime, Stacy says those interested in helping his case should contact their congressman, ask them to support the Truth in Trials act, and demand Chairman Conyers — a cosponsor of the bill — finally hold hearings on the legislation. “That would just be the best thing I could think of.”

Tell your lawmaker to support the congressmen’s proposal — and demand that the House Judiciary Committee hold a hearing on this important legislation. It’s time to lift the government’s ban on the truth.

by Charles Davis

Opinion: US Government Holds Patent For Medical Marijuana, Shows Hipocrisy

DIGITAL JOURNAL ONLINE 

Opinion: US Government Holds Patent For Medical Marijuana, Shows Hypocrisy

Opinion: US Government Holds Patent For Medical Marijuana, Shows Hipocrisy

By Michael Billy.

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Published Jul 7, 2008 by Michael Billy63 votes, 7 comments

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On the one hand, United States federal government officials have consistently denied that marijuana has any medical benefits. On the other, the government actually holds patents for the medical use of the plant.

Just check out US Patent 6630507 titled "Cannabinoids as antioxidants and neuroprotectants" which is assigned to The United States of America, as represented by the Department of Health and Human Services.

The patent claims that "Cannabinoids have been found to have antioxidant properties, unrelated to NMDA receptor antagonism. This new found property makes cannabinoids useful in the treatment and prophylaxis of wide variety of oxidation associated diseases, such as ischemic, age-related, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The cannabinoids are found to have particular application as neuroprotectants, for example in limiting neurological damage following ischemic insults, such as stroke and trauma, or in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and HIV dementia."

The patent was obtained in October of 2003.

Cannabinoids, for those who were wondering, are a group of chemical compounds found in marijuana that are also referred to as terpenophenolic compounds. One specific cannabinoid compound found in cannabis is tetrahydrocannabinol, more commonly known as THC. This substance gives marijuana its psychoactive effects.

Photo by Ryan Bushby

Cannabis Sativa is the flower of a plant that is dried and smoked, vaporized, or ingested in food through cooking with canna-butter. When used the active chemical in the plant, thc, works in the brain causing the user to feel "high." This can be described and experienced in many different ways depending how it agrees or disagrees with the user. Most commonly effects are a feeling of a calm easy escape from the everyday stress on the mind, laughing, "munchies", as well as many other feelings.

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The US government may hold this patent, but that will not stop their officials from consistently denying the benefits of medical marijuana. An FDA spokesperson, for instance, has claimed that "smoked marijuana has no currently accepted or proven medical use in the United States and is not an approved medical treatment."

I guess she didn’t get the memo.

It makes you wonder why the U.S. government is so unwilling to admit that marijuana has some valid medical properties. It seems unlikely that there is a popularity issue, especially when 60% of Americans believe that doctors should be allowed to prescribe marijuana. Maybe there are some lobbyists or bigwig campaign contributors that would get a little upset.

Since one part of the government applied for the patent of medical marijuana, and another part of the government approved that patent, it seems logical to conclude that the federal government knows that marijuana has some valid medical properties.

Now the hard part. How do we get them to admit it?

This opinion article was written by an independent writer. The opinions and views expressed herein are those of the author and are not necessarily intended to reflect those of DigitalJournal.com

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Why I was “fired” from my physician in Louisville, Kentucky.

 

Here I am in the “great Commonwealth of Kentucky”, on January 2, 2009, without a physician to attend to my health needs, after fifteen long years of struggle.  Why?  Because I smoke Cannabis for pain and anxiety among other conditions.

Since 1998 I have been through at least eight “pain clinics” and ONE M.D., that had stood beside me since 1995.  But as of today I have been “fired” as a patient for having a positive drug screen which only showed positive for Marijuana when he referred me to the last pain clinic.

Cut off, after fifteen years, for having used Cannabis for my own health.

My medical history is complicated to say the least.  I have been diagnosed with many things, and to this day I am not really sure what is wrong with me.  In my experience, the doctors in Louisville like to “cut and release”, and if you ask questions you will get the generalized answers that you already knew to begin with.  In short, if your heart is still beating when you walk in the office, you must be o.k.

The following is a short synopsis of my medical history, (though not all conclusive):

1960-1978 Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy due to chronic sickness up to 1970.  

1978 – Diagnosed with chronic depression

1983 – Diagnosed with chronic depression/anxiety

1985 – Tubal Ligation

1990- Along with the “depression/anxiety” I began having chronic abdominal pain and bladder pain.  I was (and had been all of my life) treated for chronic bladder infections.

I was having so much illness that it prompted me to leave my job of five years with a predominant insurance company because I just could not cope with the pain and sickness anymore. 

1991 – I was referred to a “women’s clinic” where I was continually seen for chronic cervical infections and bladder infections. Between 1991-1993 I had many trips to the ER because of those infections.  Of note, they always attributed my pain to the depression and anxiety and never gave me any pain medication until a month before surgery in 1993.

1993 – The Gynecologist decided that I had several cysts on my ovaries after a ultrasound, and said that he would do a partial hysterectomy and a bladder tie and that that should take care of the situation.  During the surgery, a needle was broken off in my pelvic bone, which they managed to extract after several additional hours in surgery.  After the surgery, I continued to have pelvic pain, and bladder infections.

1994 – The Gynecologist decided it was probably adhesions, and that they would do an outpatient surgery to try to resolve the problem.  That did not work either.

1995 – I was finally put on Medicare after having been given Disability in 2003 for depression.  After living through hell the previous ten years, I decided to go to a internist which was down the street from where I lived.  At that point I was put on pain medication.  However, there had been no real diagnosis of the pain I was having.

1995 – A friend encouraged me to see her “surgeon”, at which time I received emergency surgery for Gallbladder Disease.  The Surgeons stopped counting after 60 large stones and informed my family that my “insides looked like someone took a hot glue gun to them”.  The scar tissue had been so bad that they could not find my appendix or “I would have taken that out too”, he had said.  Unfortunately for me, shortly after my surgery he left the country to go back to his home country.

1996 – Continuing on pain medication from my internist, and still having many bladder problems and pelvic problems I went to another Gynecologist who offered to do a “total hysterectomy and adhesion removal”.  I was sent to outpatient surgery, but ended up in the hospital for a number of days because the surgery was intense.

I continued on through 1997 still having abdominal pain, and still on pain medication.  In 1998 he referred me to a “pain clinic”.

1998 – After coming down with an unknown illness with a high fever, my Internist admitted me to the hospital where the next day I had a CVA/Stroke.  The pain clinic I had been seeing had me on oxycontin and hydrocodone, along with Neurontin and was located in the same hospital where I was admitted.  However, somehow, when I was released 10 days later and received my medication to go home on which included pain medication, there was a mix up in the doctor’s names on the prescriptions and I was investigated for “doctor shopping” and released from their pain clinic.  I was cleared of any wrongdoing but the damage had already been done.  My internist continued to prescribe my pain medication until 2003.  Of note, I had stopped the oxycontin and Neurontin as they where really hard on my depression.  The Neurologist that had taken my case in the hospital “fired” me for being “too ill for him to treat”.

2003 – I am forced into a pain clinic again.  Incidentally, this clinic turned out to be the largest legal narcotic writer in Kentucky.  I was given oxycontin, morphine, large amounts of hydrocodone or oxycodone.  The doctor attempted a “plexis block” of my abdomen at which time one or both of my Kidneys were punctured.  I bleed for 12 hours, but “I was o.k., and it was nothing to worry about” per the doctor.  Then came the methadone.  I was frazzled all the time.  I was a “legal” drug addict that almost burned down the house more than once.  I tried to continue on and eventually quit taking everything except hydrocodone and an occasional soma.  But in 2006, I was given a “drug test” which showed that I was smoking Marijuana and guess what…They refused to fill any more narcotics EXCEPT the methadone.  At that point I gave it back to them and told them they could keep it.  I “fired” them.

I then went back to my internist which agreed to prescribe my hydrocodone.  But between 2003 and 2008 I was turned down by many other pain clinics. 

Then in December of 2008 the decision was made that my internist could no longer fill my medication’s because of a PDS at the last pain clinic.  He then “fired” me.

Of note, during the period of 2001 – 2008 I had lost my first Grandchild to a stillbirth, cared for and lost my father in 2001 and continued to live with my Mother and care for her until she was so ill that I was forced to put her in a Nursing Home in 2007.  My Mother died on November 24, 2008.  Previous to that I had lost my best friend “Sally” who was my dog that had always been beside me through it all since 1993.  My Heart has been irreversibly broken.  So with all of this loss on my mind, and then losing my only doctor of fifteen years, I have really been tested.  I credit prayer and family and my “Cannabis” for my survival.  There were so many times I just wanted to call it quits.  But there was always some “need” for me to be here.

Back in 2003 I had started researching online “Medical Marijuana”.  I knew I used it, and I knew I needed it, but I had just thought I was a “pot smoker”.  I had never credited it with saving my life until after my Dad died in 2001.  You see, he had called me about three months prior to his death and asked me if I could get him some.  Because of my ignorance of the medical benefit of Marijuana, my Father died without the medication that could have reduced his misery.  My Mother was diagnosed with HBP and Alzheimer’s which possibly could have been helped with Marijuana although I was too afraid of the “elder abuse” laws to try it.  I feel guilty about that too.  I might have had a healthier Mother for a few more years.

I have never had a police record.  I only have a glass of wine a couple of times a year.  I have even managed to stay out of the Psychiatric Hospital, although there were a few times I would have probably benefited from it.

And now, the doctor that I thought would always be there for me has left me in the cold, without even a personal phone call from him.  The letter was signed by office staff.

I do not hold any grudges against this doctor.  He did what he had to do to save his livelihood.  Although I do not know what the “pertinent details” of the situation where, I am assuming the DEA of KY was somehow involved.

In Kentucky it is called KASPER.  “KASPER” in and of itself has become a syndrome in Kentucky.  What I cannot understand is why, when KY is so known for it’s oxycontin abuse and death’s, should it be illegal for me to smoke Cannabis, in my own home, especially since I do have such a medical record.  (I have never passed a drug screening test due only to Marijuana).

It reminds me of a “genocidal drama”… Give out all the Narcotics that you can, which will downsize the population, and at the same time they can punish the people who are Marijuana users and “force” them into forfeiting their Marijuana, and using the “Pharmaceutical death drugs”.

There is no such thing as a Marijuana friendly doctor in Kentucky.  They are all scared to death.

I must say that if I had not been using Marijuana for the last fifteen years or more, I sincerely believe that I would have died by now. 

I was told by one doctor that I was “living on borrowed time”.

What kind of Government conspiracy would do such a thing as to make a “plant” illegal?

THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE, JUST FOLLOW THE MONEY!

The state of Kentucky is for all practical purposes bankrupt.  Violence and homelessness are continually on the rise.  It is NOT Marijuana that has caused this.  Statistically, Kentucky, especially certain counties, are not a healthy place to live.  And the members of my family who do not use Marijuana have had greater health problems than me in a number of cases.

Our Mayor call’s it “possibly city”.

For most of us it is nearly impossible to live here.  Lack of education and health care are abominable.  If you are one of the lucky ones who make more money than you need and/or have the benefits of a major manufacturing company or other entity, then you may survive a little longer and a little better.

But most true Kentuckians have been laborers and farmers all of their lives.  Their needs are never fully met, and the laws that prohibit Marijuana is just another way to “keep us in our place”.

It is a shame that we cannot grow Marijuana and/or Hemp on our own property, legally.

So in all reality, we never truly own anything, including our own bodies and minds.

Marijuana and Hemp prohibition is just one of many dire problems which our country is facing today.  But if we could “free these plants”, that were put on Earth by God, to be used accordingly, then maybe, just maybe, it would be a sign of us being able to take back our country’s freedoms for all people.

Sheree Krider

SMKrider:  In My Opinion

I can be reached by email at ShereeKrider@usmjparty.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hello world!

Sheree 2009

BLESSING JEFFREY’S MOM……

A VERY VERY IMPORTANT VIDEO TO SEE.  ABOUT A SEVEN YEAR OLD CHILD WITH MENTAL DISORDERS.
THE MOM, FINDS OUT THROUGH RESEARCH AND HELP FROM DOCTORS THAT MARIJUANA COULD BE A GOOD TREATMENT FOR HER CHILD.
BLESSED BE THE MOTHER WHO CARES FOR HER CHILD, AND DOES NOT LET THE GOVERNMENT TELL HER SHE CAN’T!
VERY INSPIRING,
PERSONALLY, I THINK MOST OF THE KIDS ON PHARMACEUTICALS RIGHT NOW WOULD BE MUCH BENEFITED BY CHANGING THEIR MEDICATION TO MARIJUANA.  THERE IS NO SIDE EFFECTS, ESPECIALLY NONE THAT WOULD OUTWEIGH THE SIDE EFFECTS OF THE PHARMACEUTICALS.
BLESS THIS MOTHER
SHOW HER YOUR SUPPORT