The White House: Release and pardon Marc Emery

 
 
Christopher Seekins

Granby, CT

Some stand for freedom, others oppose it. Each brings us in a different direction. For those of us who enjoy our freedom we thank people like Marc who has a global vision of standards. The United states constitution was founded on common law jurisdiction. This is essentially a contract of protection for the people. The states of America have adapted the Uniform Commercial Code which governs international contracts of protection. The Uniform Commercial Code or UCC particular to 1-103.6 indicates statutory jurisdiction in Admiralty Courts such as the US courts must have standards in accordance with common law jurisdiction reserving rights and remedy there of. The ability to extort a person into a plea bargain is not merit to cause injury to Marcs life or take away the freedom from others lives that he generates living freely. Marcs actions have not hurt any one and there is no justification to injure many lives in this case. Marc amongst other things is to thank for bringing freedom of the press to Canada with the opening of his book store and petitioning of the public as true democracy makes possible. Marc is a patriot of every country and should be treated as such. To do anything else is of a criminal nature.

Release and pardon Marc Emery

Marc Emery is a Canadian businessman and political activist who owned and operated Cannabis Culture Magazine, Pot-TV, the BC Marijuana Party, and Marc Emery’s Cannabis Culture Headquarters (previously the BCMP Bookstore, and HEMP BC before that.)
He was also the world’s most famous marijuana seed retailer and the biggest financial supporter of the marijuana movement world-wide until the US Drug Enforcement Administration and Canadian law enforcement arrested him in Canada and shut down Marc Emery Direct Seeds in July 2005.
Marc is currently imprisoned in Yazoo City medium-security prison in Yazoo City, Mississippi after being extradited on May 20th, 2010 by the Canadian government. He was sentenced on September 10th in Seattle federal court to 5 years in prison for “distribution of marijuana” seeds, though the US Drug Enforcement Administration admitted it was actually for his political activism and financing the marijuana movement (see below for that DEA document).

FACTS ABOUT MARC EMERY:

• Marc Emery is a Canadian citizen who never went to the USA as a seed seller.

• Marc Emery operated his seed business in Canada at all times, with no American branches or employees.

• Marc Emery declared his income from marijuana seed sales on his income tax, and paid over $580,000 to the Federal and Provincial governments from 1999 to 2005.

• Marc Emery is the leader of the British Columbia Marijuana Party, a registered political party that has regularly participated in elections.

• Marc Emery has never been arrested or convicted of manufacturing or distributing marijuana in Canada, as he only sold seeds.

• Marc Emery gave away all of the profits from his seed business to drug law reform lobbyists, political parties, global protests and rallies, court litigation, medical marijuana initiatives, drug rehabilitation clinics, and other legitimate legal activities and organizations.

• Marc Emery helped found the United States Marijuana Party, state-level political parties, and international political parties in countries such as Israel and New Zealand.

• Marc Emery has been known as a book seller and activist in Canada for 30 years, fighting against censorship laws and other social issues long before he became a drug law reform activist.

• Marc Emery has been a media figure for 20 years with regards to marijuana and drug law reform. He is very well-known to Canadian, American and international news media organizations.

• Marc Emery operated his business in full transparency and honesty since its inception in 1994, even sending his marijuana seed catalogue inside his magazine “Cannabis Culture” to each Member of Parliament in Canada every two months for years.

Marc openly ran “Marc Emery Direct Marijuana Seeds” from a store in downtown Vancouver and through mail-order from 1994 to 2005, with the goal to fund anti-prohibition and pro-marijuana activists and organizations across North America and the world.
Marc always paid all provincial and federal taxes on his income and made no secret to anyone of his seed-selling business. Marc was raided by police for selling seeds and bongs in 1996 and again in 1997 and 1998, but despite the seizure of his stock by police, the Canadian courts sentenced Emery only to fines and no jail time.
Canadian police then pressured the American Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to launch a cross-border attack against Marc. They arranged to have him charged under America’s much more severe laws against seeds.
Marc was arrested in Canada by American agents in 2005, and originally faced a minimum 30-year sentence in the US, with the possibility of life behind bars. After years of legal efforts, and ensuring his two co-accused received no prison time, Marc made a plea-bargain for a five-year sentence in the US. Marc had originally secured a deal with US officials to serve his five-year sentence in Canada, but the Conservative Government of Canada refused to allow this, and forced him to be extradited to the US.
The US Drug Enforcement Administration admitted on the day of Marc Emery’s arrest that his investigation and extradition were politically motivated, designed to target the marijuana legalization efforts and organizations that Emery spearheaded and financed for over a decade.

Here is the original text of DEA Administrator Karen Tandy’s statement released on July 29th, 2005 (also available in its original letterhead form by clicking here):

“Today’s DEA arrest of Marc Scott Emery, publisher of Cannabis Culture Magazine, and the founder of a marijuana legalization group — is a significant blow not only to the marijuana trafficking trade in the U.S. and Canada, but also to the marijuana legalization movement.

His marijuana trade and propagandist marijuana magazine have generated nearly $5 million a year in profits that bolstered his trafficking efforts, but those have gone up in smoke today.

Emery and his organization had been designated as one of the Attorney General’s most wanted international drug trafficking organizational targets — one of only 46 in the world and the only one from Canada.

Hundreds of thousands of dollars of Emery’s illicit profits are known to have been channeled to marijuana legalization groups active in the United States and Canada. Drug legalization lobbyists now have one less pot of money to rely on.”
On May 10th, 2010, Marc was ordered extradited by Justice Minister Rob Nicholson. He was taken to the USA on May 20th. Marc was forced to endure three weeks of complete solitary confinement for recording a “prison podcast” over the phone for release on the internet. You can listen to his 2009 “Prison Pot-casts” by clicking here.
Release and pardon Marc Emery

Kindest of regards
Christopher Seekins
www.gorillagrow.org
CEO Harmony World Wide

Petition Letter

USE THIS LINK TO SIGN PETITION!

Global Marijuana March 2012: Worldwide Protests For Pot Legalization

By Jeremiah Vandermeer, Cannabis Culture – Tuesday, May 1 2012

CANNABIS CULTURE – The 2012 Global Marijuana March is Saturday, May 5! Join the world’s largest simultaneous pot protest in 153 confirmed cities around the world, or add your city to the list.

Every year, on the first Saturday in May – just after the other global stoner gathering, 4/20 – potheads and drug law reformers gather in cities around the world for the Global Marijuana March (GMM).

Meeting at strategic gathering locations, activists and weed-smokers hit the pavement and march through the city streets, leaving stunned passer-bys and, in many cities, a large cloud of aromatic marijuana smoke.

This year, there are at least 153 confirmed cities (as the time of publication of this article) on the website WeedWiki.

There may be many more unconfirmed cities who will also have protests – to see a larger (and somewhat out-of-date) collection of cities and info, view the Big List at GlobalCannabisMarch.com.

Started in New York in 1999 by legendary pot activist Dana Beal, the March has grown to include 738 cities from 64 different nations over the years, according to to WeedWiki. Beal has had a tough last year, fighting both legal and health issues.

Over the years, Beal and other activists like Marc Emery sent thousands of GMM posters around the world (the same ones published them in the pages of Cannabis Culture).

See coverage of GMM 2011 (and more) from CC.

In some locations, the March is held on days other than May 5, and is known by a number of other names including the Worldwide Marijuana March, Million Marijuana March, World Cannabis Day, Cannabis Liberation Day, Global Space Odyssey, Ganja Day, J Day, Million Blunts March and others.

Read more about the history of the Global Marijuana March.

The scope of the GMM is truly global, with participating cities in Africa, Asia, North and South America, Europe, Australia and New Zealand.

See the list of cities in video form:

Vancouver and other Canadian cities including Montreal, London, and Victoria are on the list (and others – see list below).

Toronto’s Global Marijuana March has become the largest marijuana protest in the city, and has for the last five years been held simultaneously with the Toronto Freedom Festival (TFF). The TFF will not be held this year due to construction at its former location, Queen’s Park. (More information about Toronto and Vancouver GMM’s coming soon on CC)

Click here to go to the GMM 2012 Facebook page for links to more information and flyers, posters, and banners.

View the list of confirmed cities from WeedWiki below:

Global Marijuana March 2012 Confirmed Cities

AFRICA

South Africa

Cape Town, South Africa

ASIA

Indonesia

Jakarta, Indonesia

EUROPE

Austria

Salzburg, Austria
Vienna, Austria

Belgium

Antwerp, Belgium

Czech Republic

Prague, Czech Republic

Denmark

Aarhus, Denmark
Copenhagen, Denmark

France

Bordeaux, France
Clermont-Ferrand, France
Lille, France
Lyon, France
Marseille, France
Paris, France
Reunion, France
Toulouse, France
Tours, France

Germany

Berlin, Germany
Frankfurt, Germany
Hanover, Germany
Potsdam, Germany

Greece

Athens, Greece

Ireland

Cork, Ireland
Dublin, Ireland

Italy

Rome, Italy

Malta

Valletta, Malta

Norway

Bergen, Norway
Oslo, Norway
Stavanger, Norway
Trondheim, Norway

Poland

Poznan, Poland
Warsaw, Poland

Portugal

Lisbon, Portugal
Porto, Portugal

Spain

Madrid, Spain

Switzerland

Bern, Switzerland

United Kingdom

Cardiff, Wales, UK

OCEANIA

Australia

Launceston, Tasmania, Australia
Nimbin, New South Wales, Australia

New Zealand

Auckland, New Zealand
Christchurch, New Zealand
Dunedin, New Zealand
Hamilton, New Zealand
Hastings, New Zealand
Wellington, New Zealand
New Plymouth, New Zealand

LATIN AMERICA

Argentina

Bahia Blanca, Argentina
Bariloche, Argentina
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Comodoro Rivadavia, Argentina
Cordoba, Argentina
El Bolson, Argentina
Formosa, Argentina
La Plata, Argentina
La Rioja, Argentina
Mar del Plata, Argentina
Mendoza, Argentina
Neuquen, Argentina
Posadas, Argentina
Resistencia, Argentina
Rio Grande, Argentina
Rosario, Argentina
Salta, Argentina
San Fernando del Valle de Catamarca, Argentina
San Juan, Argentina
San Luis, Argentina
San Miguel, Tucuman, Argentina
San Pedro, Misiones, Argentina
San Salvador de Jujuy, Argentina
Ushuaia, Argentina
Venado Tuerto, Argentina

Brazil

Aracaju, Brazil
Atibaia, Sao Paulo, Brazil
Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil
Blumenau, Brazil
Brasilia, Brazil
Curitiba, Brazil
Diadema, Sao Paulo, Brazil
Fortaleza, Brazil
Guarulhos, Brazil
Joao Pessoa, Brazil
Joinville, Brazil
Juiz de Fora, Brazil
Jundiai, Sao Paulo, Brazil
Manaus, Brazil
Natal, Brazil
Niteroi, Brazil
Patos, Brazil
Petropolis, Brazil
Presidente Prudente, Brazil
Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Salvador, Bahia, Brazil
Sao Jose do Rio Preto, Brazil
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Uberlandia, Brazil
Vitoria, Espirito Santo, Brazil

Chile

Antofagasta, Chile
Calama, Chile
Concepcion, Chile
Iquique, Chile
Santiago, Chile
Valdivia, Chile
Valparaiso, Chile

Colombia

Bogota, Colombia
Cali, Colombia
Medellin, Colombia

Ecuador

Guayaquil, Ecuador

Peru

Lima, Peru
Uruguay
Florida, Uruguay
Fray Bentos, Uruguay
Montevideo, Uruguay
Nearby islands

NORTH AMERICA

Canada

Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
London, Ontario, Canada
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Vancouver, British Columbia,Canada
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

United States

Phoenix, Arizona, USA

Los Angeles, California, USA
Oakland, California, USA
Sacramento, California, USA

Boulder, Colorado, USA

Jacksonville, Florida, USA
Key West, Florida, USA

Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Boise, Idaho, USA

Chicago, Illinois, USA

Des Moines, Iowa, USA

Topeka, Kansas, USA
Wichita, Kansas, USA

Traverse City, Michigan, USA

Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Kansas City, Missouri, USA
St Louis, Missouri, USA

Lincoln, Nebraska, USA
Omaha, Nebraska, USA

Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

Durham, New Hampshire, USA

Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA

New York City, New York, USA

Cleveland, Ohio, USA
Columbus, Ohio, USA

Alva, Oklahoma, USA
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA

Eugene, Oregon, USA
Medford, Oregon, USA
Portland, Oregon, USA
Salem, Oregon, USA

Lebanon, Pennsylvania, USA

Austin, Texas, USA
Dallas, Texas, USA

Spokane, Washington, USA

CONTINUE READING…

‘Prince of Pot’ pleads guilty to federal charge

By Emanuella Grinberg, CNN May 25, 2010 10:15 a.m. EDT

After years of legal wrangling, "prince of pot" Marc Emery is pleading guilty to a U.S. distribution conspiracy charge.

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • NEW: Canadian marijuana activist Marc Emery pleads guilty to U.S. charge
  • Under terms of a plea deal, he faces up to five years in a U.S. prison
  • Co-defendants were sentenced to probation in Canada
  • Emery says he’ll go to prison to prove a point: that marijuana laws are unjust

(CNN) — A man known as Canada’s "prince of pot" pleaded guilty Monday in a deal with prosecutors that could send him to prison in the United States for five years.

Marijuana activist Marc Emery pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Seattle, Washington, to a single count of conspiracy to manufacture marijuana following an 18-month investigation into the seed-selling business Emery operated from his head shop in Vancouver, British Columbia.

U.S. District Court Judge Ricardo Martinez scheduled Emery’s sentencing August 11. At that time, the judge has the choice of accepting or rejecting the plea agreement, said Emery’s Seattle-based attorney, Richard Troberman.

"Based on comments the court has made. I have every reason to believe he will follow the plea agreement," Troberman told CNN.

Emery, 52, was brought to the United States last week. Canada’s justice minister signed an extradition order May 10 that left the outspoken libertarian with little choice after years of fighting extradition.

"Marc has never been afraid to face the music," said Emery’s wife, Jodie. "He’s spent most of his life breaking laws he considers unjust to demonstrate they’re unjust. He’ll go to jail to prove how absurd our drug laws are."

The plea comes nearly five years after Emery was arrested in Halifax, Nova Scotia, where he says he was the guest speaker at the Maritimers Unite for Medical Marijuana festival. He was accused of selling marijuana seeds to customers in the United States.

The same day, Emery wrote on his website, DEA agents raided his head shop in downtown Vancouver, where he sold bongs, pipes and books. He also produced the magazine Cannabis Culture and ran an Internet portal, Pot-TV.

He’ll go to jail to prove how absurd our drug laws are.
–Jodie Emery, defendant’s wife

The head shop was the headquarters of Emery Direct Seeds, the target of the DEA’s 18-month undercover investigation. During the investigation, according to court documents, agents bought seeds from Emery’s business over the internet and in person.

Investigators also traced his product to illegal growing operations in several states, the U.S. Attorney’s Office said in a July 2005 news release.

A statement issued by the DEA in 2005 after Emery’s arrest suggested that he was targeted for his activism, with DEA Administrator Karen Tandy touting his capture as a "significant blow not only to the marijuana trafficking trade in the United States and Canada, but also to the marijuana legalization movement."

Tandy described Emery as one of 46 of the U.S. attorney general’s most wanted international drug traffickers and the only one from Canada, with his "marijuana trade and propagandist marijuana magazine" generating nearly $5 million in profits.

Emery and two of his employees were each charged with conspiracy to distribute marijuana, conspiracy to distribute marijuana seeds and conspiracy to lauder money, charges that carry penalties of 10 years to life in prison. After years of legal wrangling with Canadian and U.S. authorities, Emery reached the plea deal on the lesser charge, Troberman said.

Co-defendants Gregory Williams and Michelle Rainey-Fenkarek entered pleas this year to lesser offenses and were placed on probation in Canada, according to court documents. They were never brought to the United States.

This prosecution has to do with his criminal activities and has nothing to do with his political activism.
–Emily Langlie, U.S. Attorney’s Office

Tandy stepped down as DEA administrator in 2007, and U.S. authorities seem to have backed down from her 2005 hard-line stance. The news release can no longer be found on the Department of Justice website, and the DEA referred calls to the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Seattle.

"This prosecution has to do with his criminal activities and has nothing to do with his political activism," said Emily Langlie, spokeswoman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office. Langlie added that she could not comment on the 2005 DEA statement.

Emery summed up his raison d’etre in a lengthy article published in Cannabis Culture and online after his arrest. He described his thoughts at the moment he was handcuffed: "Every seed sold, all the millions of dollars I had given to the cause, every speech to free our people, every arrest, jailing and raid I had endured: it was all for this moment in time."

iReport: "Prince of Pot" speaks

Much like in the United States, distribution and trafficking carry heavier punishments: a maximum of seven years for conspiracy to manufacture marijuana and a maximum sentence of life imprisonment for conspiracy to traffic in marijuana, according to a spokeswoman for Department of Justice Canada.

In practice, Canadian judges rarely mete out sentences longer than two years plus fines, based on a policy of judicial guidance that calls for incarceration as the last resort, according to several criminal defense lawyers and drug policy experts.

"Sentences typically don’t reach the mandatory minimums that are in place in U.S. federal system," Vancouver defense lawyer Kirk Tousaw said. He is Emery’s legal counsel in Canada, a contributor to his magazine and attorney for his co-defendants.

It was the U.S. who stepped in and put pressure on Canada.
–Richard Trouberman, U.S. defense attorney

RELATED TOPICS

Extradition to the United States, however, is commonplace in cases of Canadians accused of selling or smuggling drugs in the United States, said Troberman, Emery’s Seattle-based attorney. He has represented many Canadians in the United States.

"The only thing that makes this case somewhat unusual is that Marc was very visible and open about everything he did, and the Canadians had no interest in prosecuting him," Troberman said. "It was the U.S. who stepped in and put pressure on Canada."

Emery is the founder of the British Columbia Marijuana Party, and his status in Canada as a tireless champion for marijuana reform has been cemented through more than a decade of sit-ins, demonstrations and runs for political office. By his own account, he has been arrested at least a dozen times since 1995 related to his activism, and Vancouver Police have raided his shop several times since it opened in 1994.

In media interviews and biographies posted on CannabisCulture.com, Emery claims to have been fined twice for selling seeds and says he has spent three months in a Saskatchewan jail after being caught passing a joint in public.

"Some people will say he pushed it too far, but that’s his approach. He’s the enforcer on a hockey team. He makes everyone else look polite," said Eugene Oscapella, a founding member of the Canadian Foundation for Drug Policy, which shares many of Emery’s goals but pursues them through public education and legislative efforts.

To Oscapella and others familiar with Emery, the trajectory of his activism made martyrdom in a U.S. prison the next natural step.

"He did this on purpose. He did it knowing the potential consequences," Oscapella said of Emery’s Direct Seeds. "Emery has always stuck his neck out. He’s a civil libertarian, almost an anarchist, so it’s very much his character to thumb his nose at U.S. drug policies."

iReport: Emery’s wife speaks on his extradition

People familiar with the case said Emery’s fate was sealed when the current conservative Canadian government came into power touting a law and order agenda that included vows to bring in mandatory minimum laws for certain drug offenses.

From behind bars, Emery continues to guide the movement with the help of his wife, Jodie, and legions of supporters. He plans to apply for a transfer to Canada after he is formally sentenced, which is expected to occur in two to three months, his lawyer said.

Emery sent a message to supporters in an recorded telephone call with his wife while he awaited extradition. He urged them to keep up the fight against mandatory minimum sentences and other new drug enforcement laws by adopting "militant" tactics, like sit-ins at the offices of MPs and traffic blockades.

"If just one person, me, being in jail is what it takes to arouse thousands, tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands, maybe millions of Americans and Canadians to get out and be involved and be responsible and take charge and take the initiative, then I’m a very happy individual."

View Source:  CNN

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Canadian Politicians Present Thousands of Signatures In Support of Marc Emery | Cannabis Culture Magazine

Canadian Politicians Present Thousands of Signatures In Support of Marc Emery | Cannabis Culture Magazine

 

 

CANNABIS CULTURE – Members of Parliament from the Liberal, New Democratic, and Conservative Parties of Canada presented petitions today to the House of Commons with over 12,000 signatures asking the Minister of Justice to stop the extradition of marijuana activist Marc Emery.

In a show of cross-party MP support rarely seen in the House, Scott Reid (Conservative), Libby Davies (NDP), and Ujjal Dosanjh (Liberal) stood in succession and asked Conservative Minister of Justice Rob Nicholson to refuse to sign extradition orders sending Emery, a Vancouver entrepreneur and well-known activist, to the United States for a 5-year prison term.

Conservative MP Scott Reid: "I’m presenting a petition today, quite a large petition as you can see from the pile on the table beside me, regarding Marc Emery, the leader of the British Columbia Marijuana Party, who is facing deportation to the United States. The petitioners draw the attention of Parliament to a number of pertinent facts, I won’t go through all of them but I think some are relevant here. Marc Emery’s activities, the ones for which he is being extradited involve selling viable seeds, viable marijuana seeds, over the Internet. It’s worth noting that these activities were approved by Health Canada’s referral of medical marijuana patients to his seed bank. It is worth noting as well that courts in ruling on this subject, Canadian courts have ruled that a $200 fine is an appropriate punishment for this kind of activity as opposed to extradition to a country where he can face potentially life imprisonment. Finally it is worth noting that, under the Extradition Act, the petitioners point out, the Canadian Minister of Justice shall refuse to surrender a person when that surrender could involve unjust or undue or oppressive actions by the country to which he being extradited."

NDP MP Libby Davies: "I too have a very big stack of petitions to present, about 4000 petitions, along with other colleagues in the House who have received a similar number, and these are petitions from Canadians across the country who draw to our attention a matter of great urgency concerning the US call for extradition of Mr. Marc Emery as we’ve heard just earlier. Many dedicated individuals have collected approximately 12,000 petitions reflecting a strong belief that Mr. Emery or any Canadian should not face harsh punishment in the US for selling cannabis seeds on the Internet when it is not worthy of prosecution in Canada. The petitioners call on Parliament to make it clear to the Minister of Justice that such an extradition should be opposed. I am very pleased to present this; I think it is a very strong reflection of Canadians’ views on this matter and we hope that the Parliament of Canada will act on this, and certainly the Minister of Justice will take this into account."

Liberal MP Ujjal Dosanjh: "I join my previous two colleagues with respect to this petition regarding Marc Emery. I believe there is a certain degree of unfairness that is inherent in the process that has been used to deal with him, and these petitions urge the Minister, the Attorney General, to not surrender Marc Emery to the United States for extradition. While I come from British Columbia, a former attorney general and former Premier of British Columbia, I have certain sympathies with Mr. Emery, not because of what he did, but because I believe that the process that was used to arrest him and punish him wouldn’t have been done in the case of Canadian authorities wanting to arrest him and punish him, and I believe that because of that unfairness, the Minister of Justice is urged by the petitioner to take another look at it."