If you’ve never heard of Roger Casement the reason is sad, he was homosexual

For that reason he was ignored and written out of our revolutionary history.

 

 

Sheree Krider

February 17, 2016

For the purpose of this post I am linking several articles and inputting Wikipedia documentation. Because of the fact that it encompasses so much information and stretches across several articles which I happened across online I felt that the readers could ‘study’ the situation better having complete access to them all.

I am posting this because I care about what happens to Homosexuals or “LGBT’s”, if you will.

I have had friends and family that are classified in these ‘groups’, although, I, myself see no viable reason to lump any person into a group which defines them as human beings.

We are all creatures of God.  We are all loved by God.  It is only Humans which feel the need for these distinctions and that, I feel, is the saddest issue confronting our Culture as it stands today.

There should be no need for special legislation to try to ensure that everyone is treated fairly.  Our Constitution was written for that and it did not include classifications of people.  It included everyone living in this Country and those yet to arrive at the time it was written.

I do not believe that it works to try to force people to accept one another according to their classifications and in fact only serves to cause inflammatory  prejudice among those who are not willing to accept these facts of life;  that not everyone is like “them”.

However, that being said, it has been found necessary within our Country to try and repent for our sins against our Brother’s by implementing challenging legislation to try and ensure the integrity, the very ‘right to life’ of these individuals which not only include LGBT’s but many others as well including African Americans.

My hope is that within our Children’s lifetime there will come a day when no longer will we need to classify people according to race, gender, religious affiliations or sexual status.  That everyone will be accepted and loved and that when a person does a good deed, no matter what the ‘classification of the deed is’, they will be honored accordingly.  Not according to their classification.

Here is a short excerpt from Wikipedia about Roger Casement.  I hope that you will continue reading through the whole story because I feel it is important for people to know what the past has been in order to make the future better for everyone.

Roger David Casement (1 September 1864 – 3 August 1916)[1] was a British diplomat of Irish extraction, humanitarian activist, Irish nationalist, and poet. Described as the “father of twentieth-century human rights investigations”, he was honored in 1905 for the Casement Report on the Congo and knighted in 1911 for his important investigations of human rights abuses in Peru. He then made efforts during World War I to gain German military aid for the 1916 Easter Rising which sought to gain Irish independence.

In Africa as a young man, Casement first worked for commercial interests before joining the British Colonial Service. In 1891 he was appointed as a British consul, a profession he followed for more than 20 years. Influenced by the Boer War and his investigation into colonial atrocities against indigenous peoples, Casement grew to distrust imperialism. After retiring from consular service in 1913, he became more involved with the Irish Republican and separatist movement. He sought to obtain German support and weapons for an armed rebellion in Ireland against British rule during World War I. He was arrested, convicted by a British court and executed for treason.

Before the trial, the British government circulated excerpts said to be from his private journals, known as the Black Diaries, which detailed homosexual activities. Given prevailing views and existing laws on homosexuality, this material undermined support for clemency for Casement. Debates have continued about these diaries: a forensic study concluded in 2002 that Casement had written them, but interpretations differ as to their meaning in his life.

How Woodrow Wilson deceived Irish America over 1916, ignored Casement’s execution

Robert Schmuhl @irishcentral

February 16,2016

What to make of a gay 1916 icon? Roger Casement’s heroic status was denied

Cahir O’Doherty @randomirish

November 20,2015

50 facts about the Easter Rising (PHOTOS)

Matt Keough @irishcentral

January 02,2016

Clemency to Jeff Mizanskey: Life without parole for marijuana

Clemency to Jeff Mizanskey: Life without parole for marijuana

This petition will be delivered to:  Missouri, Gov. Jeremiah Nixon

Petition by  Chris Mizanskey  Sedalia, MO

My father Jeff Mizanskey has been in prison for 20 years and has no possibility of parole. For non-violent, marijuana-only offenses, my father has been sentenced to die in prison because of a “three strikes” mandatory sentencing policy in the State of Missouri.

Dad’s first offense was in 1984 when he sold an ounce to an undercover informant, and then was found to possess a half pound of marijuana when police raided his house the next day.  His next offense occurred in 1991, when he was caught in possession of a couple of ounces. But for my father’s final strike in 1993, he became an easy fall guy in a conspiracy to distribute marijuana. My dad was driving a friend to a deal that turned out to be a sting operation. All of the other convicted men involved were set free years ago, but my dad was given a virtual death sentence.

My dad is, and always has been, a good man. He taught my brother and I all about construction and a good work ethic. He has never been violent and he is a model prisoner. And over the 20 years he has been in that little cell, he has watched as violent criminals, rapists, and murderers have “paid their debts” and left – sometimes just to return a few months later.

My father is 61 years old, and has been in prison since he was 41. His parents – my grandparents – have since passed. While my dad has been trapped behind bars, generations of kids and grandkids have been born into our family who have never even met the man. The State of Missouri spends roughly $22,000/year to keep him locked up. Meanwhile all my dad wants to do is be a productive part of society, work and pay taxes, be with his family. And I want my dad back.

Governor Jay Nixon is the only person who has the power to bring my dad home by granting clemency to Jeff and calling 20 years punishment enough. Please help us reach a just and reasonable end to his prison sentence by signing and sharing this petition.

To:
Gov. Jeremiah Nixon, Missouri

Jeff Mizanskey is a non-violent, marijuana-only offender who has spent the last 20 years in a Missouri prison. He has been sentenced to be there for the rest of his life, and he has no opportunity for parole. The only hope he has to ever to become a working member of society or to hold his grandchildren in his hands is for you to grant him clemency.

His sentence was imposed because of the Prior and Persistent Drug Offender sentencing structure which requires life in prison without parole for his three felony marijuana-only offenses.
Jeff Mizanskey has never committed violence and is most certainly a model prisoner. For 20 years he has sat behind bars, only to watch as rapists and murders come and go and sometimes come back again. Meanwhile the State of Missouri spends roughly $22,000 annually to house him – over $400,000 has been spent so far.

 
On February 3, 2011, Missouri Supreme Court Chief Justice William Ray Price, Jr., delivered his final State of the Judiciary address to the Missouri General Assembly. In that speech, Chief Justice Price lambasted Missouri’s “three strikes” drug-sentencing laws as enormously costly and ineffective. “Punishment,” Price said, “is a necessary part of our criminal justice system. But our real goal for nonviolent offenders is to teach them their lesson so they can become productive law-abiding members of our society. The goal is not to lock them into a life of crime, to make them permanent wards of the state.”
Jeff Mizanskey has been punished for 20 years. He has learned his lesson and wants to become a productive, law-abiding member of our society. The goal Price mentions has been more than reached, and it is time to give Jeff back his life.

On July 6, 2012, you signed the Justice Reinvestment Act, which was intended to reduce our prison population, save the state money, and ensure that punishments are proportional to violations for non-violent offenders. While this has done a great deal of good for so many Missourians, Jeff’s status has remained unchanged.
In October 2013, Gallup released a poll showing 58% of Americans support marijuana legalization. 58% of Americans recognize the principle that imprisoning Jeff Mizanskey for the rest of his life has no net positive social benefit.

In the spirit of the Justice Reinvestment Act and in the spirit of justice itself, please grant clemency to Jeff Mizanskey today. Please pardon Jeff Mizanskey so that he does not die in prison just for marijuana.

PLEASE CONTINUE TO LINK TO SIGN PETITION!