OPN: Pain Studies


Date: Tue, 22 Jan 2008 10:39:08 -0800
From: fuzzy222222000@yahoo.com
To: opn-l@ohiopatient.net; thomas.jackson.1@ohio.edu; sg277300@ohio.edu; fuzzy222222000@yahoo.com; cneufer@neo.rr.com; opn@ohiopatient.net; rrr@robryan.org; bzink@ohiopatient.net
Subject: OPN: Pain Studies

CMCR STUDIES

Studies Under Review

Investigator

Affiliation

Title

Mark Wallace, M.D.

UCSD

Efficacy of Inhaled Cannabis in Diabetic Painful Peripheral Neuropathy

Barth Wilsey, M.D.

UCD

The Analgesic Effect of Vaporized Cannabis on Neuropathic Pain

Active Studies

No studies are active at this time.

Completed Studies

Investigator

Affiliation

Title

Donald Abrams, M.D.

UCSF

Cannabis for Treatment of HIV-Related Peripheral Neuropathy

Donald Abrams, M.D.

UCSF

Vaporization as a Smokeless Cannabis Delivery System

Jody Corey-Bloom, M.D., Ph.D.

UCSD

Short-Term Effects of Cannabis Therapy on Spasticity in MS

Sean Drummond, Ph.D.

UCSD

Sleep and Medicinal Cannabis

Ronald Ellis, M.D., Ph.D.

UCSD

Placebo-controlled, Double Blind Trial of Medicinal Cannabis in Painful HIV Neuropathy

Thomas Marcotte, Ph.D.

UCSD

Impact of Repeated Cannabis Treatments on Driving Abilities

Ian Meng, Ph.D.

UCSF

Mechanisms of Cannabinoid Analgesia

Daniele Piomelli, Ph.D.

UCI

Effects of Cannabis Therapy on Endogenous Cannabinoids

Rachel Schrier, Ph.D.

UCSD

Effects of Medicinal Cannabis on CD4 immunity in AIDS

Mark Wallace, M.D.

UCSD

Analgesic Efficacy of Smoked Cannabis

Barth Wilsey, M.D.

UCD

Double Blind, Placebo Controlled Trial of Smoked Marijuana on Neuropathic Pain

Discontinued Studies

Investigator

Affiliation

Title

Donald Abrams, M.D.

UCSF

Cannabis in Combination with Opioids for Cancer Pain: A Pilot Study

Mark Agius, M.D.

UCD

Cannabis for Spasticity/Tremor in MS: Placebo Controlled Study

Mark Barad, M.D., Ph.D.

UCLA

Cannabinoids in Fear Extinction

Suzanne Dibble, DNSc, R.N.

UCSF

Treating Chemotherapy-Induced Delayed Nausea with Cannabinoids

Dennis Israelski, M.D.

San Mateo County

MMJ for HIV-Associated DSPN: Adherence and Compliance Sub-Study

Mark Wallace, M.D.

UCSD

Analgesic Efficacy of Smoked Cannabis in Refractory Cancer Pain

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/02/12/AR2007021201332.html

Research Supports Medicinal Marijuana

AIDS Patients in Controlled Study Had Significant Pain Relief

Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, February 13, 2007; Page A14

AIDS patients suffering from debilitating nerve pain got as much or more relief by smoking marijuana as they would typically get from prescription drugs — and with fewer side effects — according to a study conducted under rigorously controlled conditions with government-grown pot.
In a five-day study performed in a specially ventilated hospital ward where patients smoked three marijuana cigarettes a day, more than half the participants tallied significant reductions in pain.

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By contrast, less than one-quarter of those who smoked "placebo" pot, which had its primary psychoactive ingredients removed, reported benefits, as measured by subjective pain reports and standardized neurological tests.
The White House belittled the study as "a smoke screen," short on proof of efficacy and flawed because it did not consider the health impacts of inhaling smoke.
But other doctors and advocates of marijuana policy reform said the findings, in today’s issue of the journal Neurology, offer powerful evidence that the Drug Enforcement Administration’s classification of cannabis as having "no currently accepted medical use" is outdated.
"This should be a wake-up call for Congress to hold hearings to investigate the therapeutic use of cannabis and to encourage more research," said Barbara T. Roberts, a former interim associate deputy director in the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, now with Americans for Safe Access, which promotes access to marijuana for therapies and research.
Countless anecdotal reports have suggested that smoking marijuana can help relieve the pain, nausea and muscular spasticity that often accompany cancer, AIDS, multiple sclerosis and other ailments. But few well-controlled studies have been conducted.
The new study enrolled 50 AIDS patients with severe foot pain caused by their disease or by the medicines they take.
The team first measured baseline pain, both subjectively (patients ranked their pain on a scale of 1 to 100) and with two standardized tests, one involving a small hot iron held to the skin and another involving hot chili pepper cream.
Then, for five days, patients lit up at 8 a.m., 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. using a calibrated puff method that calls for inhaling for five seconds, holding one’s breath for 10, then waiting 45 seconds before the next.
The cigarettes were kept frozen and locked in a safe, then thawed and humidified one day before use. Cigarette butts and other debris were collected, weighed and returned to the safe to ensure no diversion for recreational purposes.
Grown on the government’s official pot farm in Mississippi, the drug was about one-quarter the potency of quality street marijuana. The inactive version was chemically cleansed of cannabinoids, the drug’s main active ingredients.
"It smelled like and looked like" normal marijuana, said study leader Donald I. Abrams, a physician at San Francisco General Hospital, where the smoking ward was located. Like the patients, Abrams was not told who had the active pot until the study was over.
Thirteen of 25 patients who smoked the regular marijuana achieved pain reduction of at least 30 percent, compared with six of 25 who smoked placebo pot. The average pain reduction for the real cannabis was 34 percent, compared with17 percent for the placebo.
Opioids and other pills can reduce nerve pain by 20 to 30 percent but can cause drowsiness and confusion, Abrams said. And many patients complain that a prescription version of pot’s main ingredient in pill form does not work for them.
That was true for Diana Dodson, 50, who received an AIDS diagnosis in 1997 after a blood transfusion.
"I have so many layers of pain I can hardly walk," said Dodson, who was in the new study. Prescription drugs made her feel worse. "But inhaled cannabis works," she said.
Patients in the study — all of whom had smoked pot previously — reported no notable side effects, though the researchers acknowledged that people unfamiliar with the drug may not fare as well.
Igor Grant, director of the University of California Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research, which funded the research, said the study was probably the best-designed U.S. test of marijuana’s medical potential in decades. He called the results "highly believable."
But David Murray, chief scientist at the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, called the findings "not particularly persuasive." The study was relatively small, he said, and it is likely that those who received the real pot were aware of that, introducing a bias of expected efficacy.
"We’re very much supportive of any effort to ameliorate the suffering of AIDS patients," Murray said. But even if ingredients in marijuana prove useful, he added, they ought to be synthesized in a pill to make dosing more accurate and to minimize lung damage.
Separately, ending a six-year effort, a Massachusetts group learned yesterday that it had won a legal victory against the DEA in its battle for federal permission to grow its own cannabis for federally approved studies, instead of relying on government pot.
In an 87-page opinion, administrative law judge Mary Ellen Bittner ruled that it "would be in the public interest" to allow a University of Massachusetts researcher to cultivate marijuana under contract to the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), which sponsors medical research on marijuana and other drugs.
The DEA is not obligated to follow the advice of its law judges, but the detailed decision should make it difficult for the agency to balk, said MAPS President Rick Doblin.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071024141745.htm

Smoked Cannabis Proven Effective In Treating Neuropathic Pain

ScienceDaily (Oct. 25, 2007) — Smoked cannabis eased pain induced in healthy volunteers, according to a study by researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Center for Medical Cannabis Research (CMCR.) However, the researchers found that less may be more.
In the placebo controlled study of 15 subjects, a low dose of cannabis showed no effect, a medium dose provided moderate pain relief, and a high dose increased the pain response. The results suggest a "therapeutic window" for cannabis analgesia, according to lead researcher Mark Wallace, M.D., professor of anesthesiology at UCSD School of Medicine and Program Director for the UCSD Center for Pain Medicine.
The study used capsaicin, an alkaloid derived from hot chili peppers that is an irritant to the skin, to mimic the type of neuropathic pain experienced by patients with HIV/AIDS, diabetes or shingles — brief, intense pain following by a longer-lasting secondary pain. The subjects were healthy volunteers who inhaled either medical cannabis or a placebo after pain was induced. The marijuana cigarettes were formulated under NIH supervision to contain either zero, two, four or eight percent delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC.)
"Subjects reported a decrease in pain at the medium dose, and there was also a significant correlation between plasma levels of THC, the active ingredient in cannabis, and decreased pain," said Igor Grant, M.D., F.R.C.P.(C), professor and Executive Vice-Chair of the Department of Psychiatry, the director of the CMCR. "Interestingly, the analgesic effect wasn’t immediate; it took about 45 minutes for the cannabis to have an impact on the pain," he said.
The results, showing a medium-dose (4% THC by weight) of cannabis to be an effective analgesic, converged with results from the CMCR’s first published study, a paper by UCSF researcher Donald Abrams, M.D. published in the journal Neurology in February 2007. In that randomized placebo-controlled trial, patients smoking the same dose of cannabis experienced a 34% reduction in HIV-associated sensory neuropathy pain–twice the rate experienced by patients receiving a placebo.
"This study helps to build a case that cannabis does have therapeutic value at a medium-dose level," said Grant. "It also suggests that higher doses aren’t necessarily better in certain situations — something also observed with other medications, such as antidepressants."
The researchers stated that more and larger studies need to be conducted to measure the efficacy of cannabis, noting that medical marijuana could play an important role in treating patients who don’t respond well to the usual pain relievers or can’t tolerate drugs such as ibuprofen or opioids used for severe pain.
"The results of this study might help guide others doing clinical research into pain management," said Wallace.
The paper, to be published in the November issue of the journal Anesthesiology, is the second published study out of the CMCR. Headquartered at UCSD, the CMCR is collaboration between UCSD and UC San Francisco that was funded by a state-funded initiative in 1999 to rigorously study the safety and efficacy of medicinal cannabis in treating diseases.
Additional contributors to the study include Gery Schulteis, Ph.D., UCSD Department of Anesthesiology; J. Hampton Atkinson, M.D., professor, and Deborah Lazzaretto, M.S., UCSD HIV Neurobehavioral Research Center; Ian Abramson, Ph.D., UCSD Department of Mathematics and HIV Neurobehavioral Research Center; Tanya Wolfson, M.A., UCSD Department of Family and Preventive Medicine; and Heather Bentley and Ben Gouaux, UCSD Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research.
Adapted from materials provided by University of California – San Diego, via EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS.

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